Posts by robinclutterbuck

Art and music in Islington

One of our major projects is nearly complete in Islington, London.  Soldiers joined many different regiments but our schools there have been focussing on the experiences of the local regiment – the Finsbury Rifles – which went to Gallipoli in July 1915. Islington is a very different place a hundred years on: today there is a large Turkish community there.  Working with Islington Museum, we took the opportunity to look at the Gallipoli Campaign from both sides, through commemorative art works and music meditations. Musicians Jonathan Rees and Firat Derat worked with five local primary schools: Ashmount, Copehagen, Drayton Park,
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From Devon to Gallipoli

2000 miles separates them, but in some ways Devon is similar to Gallipoli, with its beaches and countryside.  In other ways the two places are worlds apart, with their different history, culture, politics and religion.  What did the students and teachers on our most recent trip to Gallipoli think? This was the third and final visit to the Gallipoli peninsula that the Gallipoli Centenary Education Project has been able to organise. The pupils, aged 14-17 years, were from West Buckland School near Barnstaple in Devon. Chris Allin, History teacher at the school, who accompanied the children said, ‘Their attitudes have
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Children at the Cenotaph

Amongst the marchers at the Cenotaph in London on Remembrance Sunday was a group from the Gallipoli Association and we were delighted to be able to include four children from Tufnell Park Primary School in the group. The four children – Amy, Charlie, Natalie and Ruby – were chosen to represent the school by their teacher Mr. Shuttleworth.  They said, ‘It was an opportunity to take part in an experience of a lifetime. It helped us realise and feel the importance of remembering those who made the ultimate sacrifice.’ The children brought a wreath which joined the carpet of red beneath the
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Edinburgh goes to Gallipoli

Students from two Edinburgh secondary schools have recently returned from Turkey after a battlefield trip to the Gallipoli peninsula. This was the second visit to the Gallipoli peninsula that the project has been able to organise and we were delighted to be able to take Scottish pupils. Thousands of Scottish soldiers went to Gallipoli and many never came back. The Scottish government has included the Gallipoli Campaign as a key part of its commemorations programme so it is fitting that we could take Edinburgh schools to the Peninsula this year. Indeed the schools have been partly subsidised by the government’s Battlefield Visits
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Islington’s Gallipoli

In several places across Britain our regional projects have been getting going: in Devon several schools are working with two artists and the Multi Story Theatre Company, and there are two Scottish projects in Hawick and South Lanarkshire. In Islington, London, a project with a musical flavour has just started and we are featuring this in this blog. Islington Museum has started a blog telling the stories of those men who travelled from Islington to Mudros to fight in the disastrous Gallipoli campaign, and also asking what the campaign means to our local community today. Rebecca Campbell-Gay, the Education Officer
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One of Gallipoli’s youngest grandsons writes for us

We are delighted to welcome Kobi Watson as our guest blogger.  Kobi, 15, is one of the youngest grandson of a Gallipoli veteran (also the youngest member of the Gallipoli Association!), and has just got back to Australia after joining 10,000 others at the Dawn Service at Anzac Cove in Gallipoli on 25th April, 100 years to the day when his grandfather Horace Martyr landed on the same beach.  Kobi, from Melbourne like his grandfather, was one of 80 lucky students from the state of Victoria to win a place to represent their country at the centenary event in Turkey.  He
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Different histories in Germany – and don’t mix your Krupp with your Krups!

Oberhausen sits where the Ruhr joins the Rhine, crammed into the biggest conurbation in Germany with Dusseldorf, Essen, Bonn and Dortmund – 12 million people altogether.  The whole area was flattened during the Second World War’s bombing raids so it’s hard to find much in Oberhausen predating the 1950s but the heavy industry of the region had made it the powerhouse of the German military machine in both wars. Krupp, based in Essen, was the biggest company in Europe at the start of the First World War, selling weapons to the world, with the Ottoman Empire its biggest customer.  Shells
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Categories: Blog.