A visit from an old comrade

On Sunday 23rd May 1971 a party of veterans from the Gallipoli Campaign made another visit, fifty-six years after they had last been there. In the party was Sergeant G. E. Dale, now in his seventies. Arriving at Green Hill Cemetery, Sgt. Dale noticed a gravestone. Of course he knew many of the names on the graves, but this one struck him.

This is what he wrote in his diary later.

Extract from Sergeant G. E. Dale's diary, 1971

Extract from Sergeant G. E. Dale’s diary, 1971 (Gallipoli Association)

 

On this page is a bit more information about Charlie Chrisp. However, the evidence will never capture the feelings of camaraderie which struck Sgt. Dale when he saw Charlie’s grave after all those years.

Charlie Chrisp's grave in Green Hill Cemetery (photo: R. Clutterbuck)

Charlie Chrisp’s grave in Green Hill Cemetery (photo: R. Clutterbuck)

Green Hill Cemetery, Gallipoli (CWGC)

Green Hill Cemetery, Gallipoli (CWGC)

After the war many soldiers' bodies were exhumed and re-buried (CWGC)

After the war many soldiers’ bodies were exhumed and re-buried (CWGC)

A century on  . . .

On 29th October 2015, just over a century after Charlie Chrisp was killed, a school group from Devon visited Green Hill Cemetery and saw Charlie’s grave.

 

Listen to what 15 year old Issy Fincher had to say about it. 

Charlie Chrisp before Gallipoli

Charlie was born around 1893. In the 1911 Census he is recorded as Charles Bramley Chrisp, age 17, Apprentice Coppersmith in Palmer’s Shipyard, living with his parents John and Rachel Chrisp and family at 66 Croft Terrace, Jarrow. He signed up to Kitchener’s ‘New Armies’ and joined the Royal Field Artillery, travelling out to Gallipoli to man a Battery like this.

Charlie Chrisp's home in Jarrow today (Google)

Charlie Chrisp’s home in Jarrow today (Google)

Charlie Chrisp worked at Palmers shipyards in Jarrow and would have been at the launch of H.M.S. Queen Mary in 1912

Charlie Chrisp worked at Palmer’s shipyards in Jarrow and would have been at the launch of H.M.S. Queen Mary in 1912 (Wikipedia)